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The Royal College of Surgeons have proposed using outcomes from necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) surgery for revalidation of neonatal surgeons. The aim of this study was therefore to calculate the number of infants in the UK/Ireland with surgical NEC and describe outcomes that could be used for national benchmarking and counselling of parents. A prospective nationwide cohort study of every infant requiring surgical intervention for NEC in the UK was conducted between 01/03/13 and 28/02/14. Primary outcome was mortality at 28-days. Secondary outcomes included discharge, post-operative complication, and TPN requirement. 236 infants were included, 43(18%) of whom died, and eight(3%) of whom were discharged prior to 28-days post decision to intervene surgically. Sixty infants who underwent laparotomy (27%) experienced a complication, and 67(35%) of those who were alive at 28 days were parenteral nutrition free. Following multi-variable modelling, presence of a non-cardiac congenital anomaly (aOR 5.17, 95% CI 1.9-14.1), abdominal wall erythema or discolouration at presentation (aOR 2.51, 95% CI 1.23-5.1), diagnosis of single intestinal perforation at laparotomy (aOR 3.1 95% CI 1.05-9.3), and necessity to perform a clip and drop procedure (aOR 30, 95% CI 3.9-237) were associated with increased 28-day mortality. These results can be used for national benchmarking and counselling of parents.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/srep41149

Type

Journal article

Journal

Sci Rep

Publication Date

27/01/2017

Volume

7