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OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether life-long adherence to a vegetarian diet is associated with adult height, age at menarche, adult body weight and body mass index (BMI), used as indicators of growth, development and obesity, in a large sample of adults. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. Anthropometric data and information on age, ethnicity, education, age at menarche and age at becoming a vegetarian were obtained through a questionnaire. Self-reported height and weight were calibrated using predictive equations derived from a previous validation study. SETTING: United Kingdom. SUBJECTS: The study includes 45 962 British men and women aged > or = 20 years of whom 16,083 were vegetarians (not eating fish or meat). RESULTS: In men and women, there were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between life-long vegetarians (n = 125 (men) and n = 265 (women)) and people who became vegetarian at age > or = 20 years (n = 3122 (men) and n = 8137 (women)). Nor was there a significant difference in age at menarche between life-long vegetarian women and women who became vegetarian at age > or = 20 years. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that, compared with people who become vegetarian when adult, life-long vegetarians do not differ in adult height, weight, BMI or age at menarche in women.

Original publication

DOI

10.1079/phn2005730

Type

Journal article

Journal

Public Health Nutr

Publication Date

10/2005

Volume

8

Pages

870 - 875

Keywords

Adult, Anthropometry, Body Height, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Vegetarian, Female, Humans, Male, Menarche, Nutritional Requirements, Nutritional Status, Nutritive Value, Time Factors, United Kingdom