Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to prospectively examine the associations of total, domain-specific, and intensity-specific physical activity with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among Chinese hypertensive adults. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study in 150 391 hypertensive participants aged 30-79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank study of 512 891 participants recruited from 10 diverse areas across China during 2004-2008. Participants with heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer at baseline were excluded. RESULTS: During 1069 863 person-years of follow-up (median 7.1 years), a total of 5332 men and 4384 women died. Compared with hypertensive participants in the lowest level of total physical activity, the hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 0.80 (0.76-0.84), 0.69 (0.65-0.73), and 0.67 (0.62-0.72) for those in quartiles 2-4 (Ptrend < 0.001), respectively. Inverse associations were also observed for cardiovascular mortality. Being active in occupational, domestic, and leisure time were associated with lower risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. However, the adjusted ratio for active commuting was 1.08 (1.02-1.15) for all-cause mortality. High levels of low-intensity, moderate-intensity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity were consistently associated with lower risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSION: Among Chinese hypertensive adults, a higher level of physical activity reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, independent of intensities of physical activity. Not only leisure-time but also occupational and domestic physical activities were benefited.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0.

Original publication

DOI

10.1097/HJH.0000000000001601

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Hypertens

Publication Date

08/11/2017