Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

PURPOSE: Interest is growing in a possible link between epilepsy and bipolar disorder (BPD). We used two large datasets of hospital admission data to determine whether epilepsy and BPD occur together in the same individuals more commonly than expected. METHODS: We undertook retrospective cohort studies using the Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS) and English national linked Hospital Episode Statistics. We constructed a cohort of people in each dataset admitted with epilepsy (without prior admission for BPD), and a control cohort (without prior admission for BPD), and compared their subsequent admission rates for BPD. Conversely, we constructed a cohort of people in each dataset admitted with BPD and a control cohort (both without prior admission for epilepsy), and compared their subsequent admission rates for epilepsy. RESULTS: In the epilepsy cohort, compared with the control cohort, the rate ratio (RR) for BPD was significantly high at 3.0 (95 % confidence interval 1.7-5.1) in the ORLS and 3.6 (3.3-3.9) in the all-England dataset. In the BPD cohort, the RR for epilepsy was 2.2 (1.2-3.7) in the ORLS and 4.2 (4.0-4.4) in the all-England cohort. We found no significant differences between RRs for males and females. CONCLUSIONS: Epilepsy and BPD occur together in individuals more frequently than expected by chance.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s00127-014-0853-9

Type

Journal article

Journal

Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol

Publication Date

09/2014

Volume

49

Pages

1483 - 1488

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Bipolar Disorder, Child, Child, Preschool, England, Epilepsy, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Medical Record Linkage, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult