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BACKGROUND: This study examines the relationship between light drinking during pregnancy and the risk of socioemotional problems and cognitive deficits at age 5 years. METHODS: Data from the nationally representative prospective UK Millennium Cohort Study (N=11,513) were used. Participants were grouped according to mothers' reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy: never drinker; not in pregnancy; light; moderate; heavy/binge. At age 5 years the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) and British ability scales (BAS) tests were administered during home interviews. Defined clinically relevant cut-offs on the SDQ and standardised scores for the BAS subscales were used. RESULTS: Boys and girls born to light drinkers were less likely to have high total difficulties (for boys 6.6% vs 9.6%, OR=0.67, for girls 4.3% vs 6.2%, OR=0.69) and hyperactivity (for boys 10.1% vs 13.4%, OR=0.73, for girls 5.5% vs 7.6%, OR=0.71) scores compared with those born to mothers in the not-in-pregnancy group. These differences were attenuated on adjustment for confounding and mediating factors. Boys and girls born to light drinkers had higher mean cognitive test scores compared with those born to mothers in the not-in-pregnancy group: for boys, naming vocabulary (58 vs 55), picture similarities (56 vs 55) and pattern construction (52 vs 50), for girls naming vocabulary (58 vs 56) and pattern construction (53 vs 52). Differences remained statistically significant for boys in naming vocabulary and picture similarities. CONCLUSIONS: At age 5 years cohort members born to mothers who drank up to 1-2 drinks per week or per occasion during pregnancy were not at increased risk of clinically relevant behavioural difficulties or cognitive deficits compared with children of mothers in the not-in-pregnancy group.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/jech.2009.103002

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Epidemiol Community Health

Publication Date

01/2012

Volume

66

Pages

41 - 48

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Affective Symptoms, Age Factors, Alcohol Drinking, Child Behavior Disorders, Child, Preschool, Cognition Disorders, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Maternal Welfare, Mental Disorders, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Pregnancy, Psychometrics, Risk Assessment, Risk-Taking, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult