Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

AIMS: To estimate the potential effectiveness of different "high-risk" and "population" approaches to the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in middle-aged British men, after correction for regression dilution bias. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a combination of cohort and randomised controlled trial evidence to estimate the effectiveness of high-risk strategies, based on the identification of high-risk factors or high absolute risk, and strategies based on population-wide reductions in cholesterol and blood pressure. High-risk strategies were potentially effective but would need to be used widely to have a substantial effect on CVD in the population. Aggressive pharmacological treatment (using statins, beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors and aspirin) in individuals with a 10-year Framingham event risk of >or=30% (6% of population) would have reduced major CVD by at most 11%. This figure increased to 34% at a >or=20% treatment threshold (26% of population). In contrast, modest downwards shifts in the population distributions of serum total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure led to marked expected reductions in major CVD. Taking regression dilution bias into account, 10% reductions in long-term mean blood cholesterol and blood pressure could have reduced major CVD by 45%. CONCLUSIONS: If high-risk strategies are to have a major impact on CVD in the population, they need to be more widely used than previously envisaged. Population-wide reduction of major risk factors is needed if CVD is to be substantially reduced.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.ehj.2003.11.012

Type

Journal article

Journal

Eur Heart J

Publication Date

03/2004

Volume

25

Pages

484 - 491

Keywords

Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Health Policy, Health Promotion, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Primary Prevention, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors