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Some dietary factors could be involved as cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis, but evidence is inconclusive. There are no data about the effect of fruits and vegetables intake (F&V) on cervical cancer from cohort studies. We examined the association between the intake of F&V and selected nutrients and the incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive squamous cervical cancer (ISC) in a prospective study of 299,649 women, participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A calibration study was used to control measurement errors in the dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 9 years of follow-up, 253 ISC and 817 CIS cases were diagnosed. In the calibrated model, we observed a statistically significant inverse association of ISC with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total fruits (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.98) and a statistically nonsignificant inverse association with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total vegetables (HR 0.85: 95% CI 0.65-1.10). Statistically nonsignificant inverse associations were also observed for leafy vegetables, root vegetables, garlic and onions, citrus fruits, vitamin C, vitamin E and retinol for ISC. No association was found regarding beta-carotene, vitamin D and folic acid for ISC. None of the dietary factors examined was associated with CIS. Our study suggests a possible protective role of fruit intake and other dietary factors on ISC that need to be confirmed on a larger number of ISC cases.

Original publication

DOI

10.1002/ijc.25679

Type

Journal article

Journal

Int J Cancer

Publication Date

15/07/2011

Volume

129

Pages

449 - 459

Keywords

Adult, Aged, Ascorbic Acid, Carcinoma, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Diet, Europe, Female, Folic Acid, Follow-Up Studies, Fruit, Humans, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Nutrition Surveys, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms, Vegetables, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, beta Carotene