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We test whether genetic influences that explain individual differences in aggression in early life also explain individual differences across the life-course. In two cohorts from The Netherlands (N = 13,471) and Australia (N = 5628), polygenic scores (PGSs) were computed based on a genome-wide meta-analysis of childhood/adolescence aggression. In a novel analytic approach, we ran a mixed effects model for each age (Netherlands: 12-70 years, Australia: 16-73 years), with observations at the focus age weighted as 1, and decaying weights for ages further away. We call this approach a 'rolling weights' model. In The Netherlands, the estimated effect of the PGS was relatively similar from age 12 to age 41, and decreased from age 41-70. In Australia, there was a peak in the effect of the PGS around age 40 years. These results are a first indication from a molecular genetics perspective that genetic influences on aggressive behavior that are expressed in childhood continue to play a role later in life.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s10519-021-10076-6

Type

Journal article

Journal

Behavior genetics

Publication Date

09/2021

Volume

51

Pages

592 - 606

Addresses

Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. C.M.vander.Laan@vu.nl.

Keywords

ACTION Consortium