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Stephen McCall

BSc MSc (OXON)

DPhil Student

Stephen gained a BSc in Geography with First Class honours from the University of Aberdeen in 2013. During this degree programme he became an intern at the Epidemiology Group, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen. In this role, he completed his undergraduate dissertation "Evaluating the social determinants of teenage pregnancy and preterm birth using an obstetric database from 1950-2010" under the supervision of Dr Sohinee Bhattacharya, Dr Lorna Philip and Professor Gary Macfarlane.

After graduation he was employed as a research assistant for the epidemiology group. In this role, he completed a systematic review and secondary data analysis on "Repeat abortions in NHS Grampian". He was further employed as a research assistant for the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank under the supervision of Dr Sohinee Bhattacharya. 

Since commencing as a research assistant, Stephen has continued to work on projects led by Professor Phyo Myint in the Aberdeen Gerontological and Epidemiological INter-disciplinary Research Group, Epidemiology Group, University of Aberdeen. Stephen is currently an honorary research affiliate in the AGEING theme, University of Aberdeen.

Stephen recently completed his Masters in Global Health Science at the University of Oxford. His MSc dissertation examined factors associated with maternal mortality in women of advanced maternal age. This project was supervised by Dr Manisha Nair and Professor Marian Knight. 

Stephen is undertaking research for his DPhil on rare and severe complications of pregnancy, through multi-national collaborative studies using the International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems (INOSS). His work is being jointly supervised by Professor Marian Knight and Professor Jenny Kurinczuk.