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A prospective epidemiological study of the early stages of the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was performed on London working men. The findings showed that forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) falls gradually over a lifetime, but in most non-smokers and many smokers clinically significant airflow obstruction never develops. In susceptible people, however, smoking causes irreversible obstructive changes. If a susceptible smoker stops smoking he will not recover his lung function, but the average further rates of loss of FEV1 will revert to normal. Therefore, severe or fatal obstructive lung disease could be prevented by screening smokers' lung function in early middle age if those with reduced function could be induced to stop smoking. Infective processes and chronic mucus hypersecretion do not cause chronic airflow obstruction to progress more rapidly. There are thus two largely unrelated disease processes, chronic airflow obstruction and the hypersecretory disorder (including infective processes).

Type

Journal article

Journal

Br Med J

Publication Date

25/06/1977

Volume

1

Pages

1645 - 1648

Keywords

Adult, Age Factors, Airway Obstruction, Bronchial Diseases, Chronic Disease, Forced Expiratory Volume, Humans, Infection, London, Male, Middle Aged, Mucus, Prospective Studies, Smoking