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BACKGROUND: Short or long sleep duration has been associated with some major chronic diseases, but whether disease-related blood biomarkers vary according to habitual sleep duration is unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess blood biomarker levels in relation to total sleep duration. METHODS: The analysis includes 459,796 white British adults aged 40-69 during 2006-2010 in UK Biobank. At recruitment, blood samples and self-reported information on total sleep duration were collected from participants. A panel of blood biomarkers were measured. Using linear regression, we estimated geometric mean concentrations of blood biomarkers and mean ratio of ApoB/ApoA1 by sleep duration adjusted for sex, age at data collection, time of blood collection, and lifestyle covariates. RESULTS: Percentage differences in the concentrations of most biomarkers by sleep duration were modest. The largest differences were for C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory biomarker) and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT, a liver function biomarker), and the differences were markedly attenuated after multivariable-adjustment. The multivariable-adjusted geometric means of CRP and of GGT were 14% and 14% higher in <6 h vs 7-8 h of sleep; and 22% and 12% higher in >9 h vs 7-8 h of sleep, respectively. CONCLUSION: In white British adults, most blood biomarker levels varied only modestly with sleep duration and the remaining associations may be due to residual confounding.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.sleep.2021.10.018

Type

Journal article

Journal

Sleep Med

Publication Date

29/10/2021

Volume

88

Pages

256 - 261

Keywords

Blood biomarkers, C-reactive protein, Gamma glutamyltransferase, Sleep duration, UK Biobank